Review: “Spells” by Michel de Ghelderode

Spells from Wakefield Press collects thirteen tales by Michel de Ghelderode, best known as a prolific dramatist, and includes work that has been anthologized alongside other such luminaries of the Weird as Jean Ray and Jean Muno.  Each tale contains some unique take on the idea of “spells,” often with a focus on the realistic interpretations of […]

Hyenas, Horses, and Rabbits, Oh My!: A Read Along Journey through the Leonora Carrington Century

Fans of Leonora Carrington’s weird and fantastic fiction had their wishes met last April. In celebration of the Surrealist’s centennial (she would have been 100 on April 6th), the literary world has come together to bring most of her catalog back in print, alongside a new evaluation of her life. In the U.S., Dorothy, A Publishing Project […]

Interview: Jeff VanderMeer on “Borne”: "People can be in their memories a kind of resistance against the dominant narrative"

This interview originally appeared in Gulf Coast magazine on April 28. It is reprinted here with permission of the author. Author Jeff VanderMeer’s newest novel Borne (FSG, out April 25th) has been named one of the most anticipated of 2017 by The New York Times, Publishers Weekly, and others. Colson Whitehead writes, “Jeff VanderMeer’s Southern Reach […]

Borne” Artwork

This gallery contains 13 photos.

One thing that’s fascinating about Jeff VanderMeer’s 2017 novel Borne is the weird artwork the novel has inspired: from a wordcut of Mord above the ruined city to a sculpture of Borne to colorful illustrations of the dead astronaut and foxes. We wanted to compile a gallery of some of the pieces of art to highlight the fantastic work […]

Review: “You Will Grow Into Them” by Malcolm Devlin

Maybe I’m susceptible to some lurking horrors more than others, but Malcolm Devlin’s first short story collection, You Will Grow Into Them, gave me the creeps before I even opened the front cover. Is the gritty, textured skin so prominently foregrounded being pulled off — or is it put on, the way one would a glove? Why is the […]

101 Weird Writers #46 — Ryūnosuke Akutagawa: "Life is more hellish than hell itself"

This post is part of an ongoing series on 101 weird writers featured in The Weird compendium, the anthology that serves as the inspiration for this site. There is no ranking system; the order is determined by the schedule of posts. Rynosuke Akutagawa (1892 – 1927) was a Japanese writer active in Taish period Japan and often called the ‘father […]

Interview: Ramon Glazov on “The Twenty Days of Turin”

This year marks the first time that The Twenty Days of Turin, written by Giorgio De Maria in 1975, has been translated into English. Its translation couldn’t be any more timely: De Maria’s novel, partly a reaction to the violent fascism that plagued Italy during the 1970s, perfectly reflects the bleak political landscape and uncertain times we find ourselves […]

Interview: Tartarus and Singing Stones with R.B. Russell

Ray (R.B.) Russell is an English author, publisher, composer, and filmmaker.  His written works include numerous short stories and novellas, the most recent of which is The Stones Are Singing.  Russell’s fiction has been nominated for the World Fantasy Award and British Fantasy Award, and works such as Bloody Baudelaire and The Dark Return of […]

Interview: Weird Fiction and More at Valancourt Books

Robert Aickman is no stranger to us here at Weird Fiction Review. So when Valancourt Books published a collection of his strange tales last year called “The Late Breakfasters and Other Strange Stories,” we took note. Valancourt has been on our radar for a while, though, for not only publishing dark fiction — Gothic, horror, supernatural, and, of course, Weird — but […]