The Lost Machine” Recap

Last week we finished our serialization of all eleven chapters of The Lost Machine, an illustrated novel by author and artist Richard K. Kirk. The Lost Machine follows Lumsden Moss’s journey from the plague-ridden Brickscold Prison to the City of Steps to find the killer of the children he once taught and was sentenced for murdering. Along the […]

Interview: Richard A. Kirk: Weird Art, Weaveworld, and The Lost Machine

Today we’re very pleased to be kicking off a serialization of The Lost Machine, a short novel illustrated and written by Richard A. Kirk. Kirk is no stranger to weird fiction – he’s illustrated works by Clive Barker, Caitlín R. Kiernan, China Mieville, and more. With protean landscapes and chimerical creatures, Kirk’s artwork fits perfectly within the weird fiction landscape. We’re featuring an […]

End-of-Year Book List (2015 Edition)

After the amazing year we had in 2014, it was hard to believe that we’d have another one that was just as strong in 2015. However, this year managed to live up to the previous with great new fiction, continuing periodicals, and the reprinting of old classics. Perhaps the biggest news this year was the republishing of a trio of […]

Weird Writers Recap

Today we’re publishing the 38th entry in our 101 Weird Writers series. It’s the final entry of 2015 for the Weird Writers series and we’re almost halfway through the list. We created the Weird Writers series as a companion to The Weird: A Compendium of Strange and Dark Stories in which each article in the series focuses on a particular story and author from The […]

Interview: Lincoln Michel: "Weird is a compliment... even if meant as an insult."

Today we’re publishing a story called “Things Left Outside” by writer Lincoln Michel. It’s one of 25 stories featured in his 2015 debut collection, Upright Beasts. Michel is the editor-in-chief of electricliterature.com and a founding editor of Gigantic. His work has appeared in Granta, Oxford American, Unstuck, Tin House, Pushcart Prize anthology, and elsewhere. He is the co-editor of Gigantic Worlds, an anthology of science flash fiction, and the author […]

It’s a Weird Summer at WFR

Hello weird readers. I hope you’re having a good summer. New content this summer has been quite sporadic at Weird Fiction Review due to vacations, workshops, and other events. Despite the lack of pieces we’ve posted this summer, we’ve had some tremendous works. We’ve featured some great stories including “When Raspberries Bloom in August” by Haralambi Markov, “A Hard […]

Our Journey Through Strange Ornithology Continues

Dear beloved weird fiction fans, we will be continuing our exploration of birds for the next week. In typical Weird Fiction Review fashion though, these aren’t be normal, run-of-the-mill sparrows, bluejays, and robins. No sir/madame! These are very curious creatures from ghost birds with bizarre calls to legends of spirits that have taken the form of birds. Weird Bird Fortnight is our second special this […]

Andrew Michael Hurley and “The Loney”: An interview with the author of Tartarus' newest novel

If it had another name, I never knew, but the locals called it The Loney — that strange nowhere between the Wyre and the Lune.… Dull and featureless it may have looked, but The Loney was a dangerous place. A wild and useless length of English coastline. A dead mouth of a bay that filled and emptied twice a day and made Coldbarrow […]

A Conversation about the Uncanny: Marjorie Sandor talks about her new anthology The Uncanny Reader

I’ve always thought of weird fiction and uncanny literature as being one and the same. It was only until recently when I read an anthology called The Uncanny Reader: Stories from the Shadows that I realized that while there are many commonalities and similarities, the uncanny and the weird aren’t exactly synonymous. In The Uncanny Reader, the editor, Marjorie Sandor, opens with […]

The Visible Filth” by Nathan Ballingrud: A look at Nathan Ballingrud's new novella

It is believed that the response of disgust has evolved in animals such as humans in order to prevent them from eating food which may be harmful. Disgust is mainly triggered by the sense of taste although it may also be triggered by smell, touch, or – of course – vision. It’s this last sense which Nathan Ballingrud appeals to in his […]